United Nations (UN)

Fossil-found place on stamps of United Nations

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Contents:
The United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) is the postal agency of the United Nations.
It issues postage stamps and postal stationery, denominated in the United States dollars for the United Nations offices in New York, in Swiss francs for the offices in Geneva and in euros (formerly schillings) for the offices in Vienna, Austria.
Postage rates charged are identical to those of the host nation.
Only United Nations stamps in the appropriate currency may be used at a given United Nations office.
In practice however, most UN agencies use meters, and the stamps are most often used by tourists and collectors. Since the stamps may not be used outside the UN offices, they may be purchased in bulk on the secondary market as discount postage at well below face value. [R1]



Some stamps of the United Nations Postal Administration to consider: fossil found places

19.03.1999 "World Heritage: Australia" [1] UN New York (USA) and UN Geneva (Switzerland)
Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations 1999 Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations 1999 Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations 1999
19.03.1999 "World Heritage: Australia" [1] UN Vienna (Austria)
Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations 1999 Michel-online and printed stamps catalog

Notes:
Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations 1999
Australian Willandra lakes, fossil found place, on stamps of United Nations (New york, USA) 1999 MiNr.: 814, Scott: 756f

[1] The Willandra Lakes Region, in the semi-arid zone in southwest New South Wales (NSW), contains a relict lake system whose sediments, geomorphology and soils contain an outstanding record of a low-altitude, non-glaciated Pleistocene landscape.
It also contains an outstanding record of the glacial-interglacial climatic oscillations of the late Pleistocene, particularly over the last 100,000 years.
Ceasing to function as a lake ecosystem some 18,500 years ago, Willandra Lakes provides excellent conditions to document life in the Pleistocene epoch, the period when humans evolved into their present form.

The undisturbed stratigraphic context provides outstanding evidence for the economic life of Homo sapiens sapiens to be reconstructed.
Archaeological remains such as hearths, stone tools and shell middens show a remarkable adaptation to local resources and a fascinating interaction between human culture and the changing natural environment.
Several well-preserved fossils of giant marsupials have also been found here. [R2]



References:
  •   [R1] Postal History and Philately of the United Nations Postal Administration: Wikipedia
  •   [R2] Willandra lakes: UNESCO


Acknowledgements:
Many thanks to Dr. Peter Voice from Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Western Michigan University, for the draft page review and his valuable comments.


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